Wales Hostels


Wales Travel Tips & Suggestions

Carmarthen is brilliant! Great for shopping and even better for a good social drink!
St. David's is the smallest city in the UK, but it is by no means lacking in things to do or see, so it's worth getting a hostel here. The hostels around St. David's tend to be outside of the city, but there is a shuttle bus that runs frequently along the coast that is a hail-and-ride service, so you can hop on and …
Trefin is a tiny village on the coast of Pembrokeshire in Wales. Aside from the houses and the rental cottages, there is a small pub/inn (The Ship), and a small cafe that is also a Trefin hostel (which also houses the village hall). You can get food from The Ship (they serve lunch and dinner), but it is a bit pricey. …
Llandudno is a quintessentially Victorian seaside resort on the North Wales coast. In true seaside-town style, tea rooms jostle for business with cafes offering classic fare like fish and chips. The pier (the longest in Wales) offers family-friendly amusements and treats to appease the little ones. Summertime on the …
Fishguard is a small harbor town on the western coast of Wales and a popular destination as a port for a ferry ride to or from Ireland (it is also fairly accessible by train or car). There is only a local bus service that passes through town, but it will take you to almost any other destination along the Pembrokeshire …
Cardiff is a great place to sample a lot of what Wales has to offer, and there are more hostels in Cardiff than anywhere else in Wales. From Cardiff Castle in the heart of the city to Cardiff Bay, you can see everything the city has to offer on foot or just a short bus trip away from your hostel. Cardiff is also a …
Brecon is a tourist town, located at the southern edge of the Brecon Beacons National Park; flint finds date the first settlements in the area from the fortieth or fiftieth century BC. From the town, you have an excellent view of the Brecon Beacons Mountains, like the Pen y Fan, the highest mountain in the south of …
Abergavenny is a lovely Welsh market town located on the western outskirts of the Brecon Beacons National Park. This is an easy town to get to, as there are regular trains from the south from Cardiff and from the north from Hereford and beyond. There are also National Express buses that pass through the town daily. …
Bala is a small town most known for being home to Wales’ biggest freshwater lake and for its proximity to the Snowdonia National Park. The four-mile long Bala Lake, or Llyn Tegid in Welsh, is the prime attraction for most tourists and popular spot for sailing, canoeing, and fishing. Bala hostels are not in plentiful …
Newport is a relatively busy city, just east of Cardiff, tucked in the southeast region of the country. There aren't a ton of hostels in Newport, but you will find some options here. It's one of the larger cities in Wales, and sits on the River Usk. Though it is in close proximity to England, Newport is easily reached …
Conwy is best known for its fantastically well preserved castle and walls. Built as part of a network of castles in an attempt to subdue the Welsh by the English, the castle stands proudly atop a rocky hill. The walls include a large part of the town and provide a great area to walk through. If possible, stay within …
Bridgend, located in the South West of Wales (approximately halfway between Swansea and the country's capital, Cardiff), is a pedestrian- and cycle-friendly town. You can walk to all major attractions and facilities within no more than twenty minutes. Bridgend is also located on the national cycle network (Celtic Trail …
Carmarthen sits on the River Towy in Wales, and is a fairly large city steeped in legend and history, and as such, attracts all sorts of visitors. Rumored to be the birthplace of the Arthurian sorcerer Merlin (in a cave outside of town), it is also possibly the oldest town in Wales. Be sure to look for Merlin’s Oak ( …
Caernarfon is a picturesque, little harbor town on the northwest coast of Wales. The streets and buildings are clean and well taken care of, and the locals are quite friendly and generally proud of their part of the world. The castle is probably the most notable attraction in the local vicinity. It is amazingly well …
Haverfordwest is the central transportation hub for most of the Pembrokeshire area, in the southwest region of Wales. It is easy to reach by train and bus, though make sure to check the schedules, because the local buses often stop running before long-distance coaches (like National Express) make it into town. There …